Site by Geoffrey Hale

psychology

Mind Wandering

Mind wandering is a superpower to which unhappiness has been shown to correlate.

http://www.npr.org/2014/02/14/267188672/are-we-happier-when-we-stay-in-the-moment

Mind wandering can be useful if you maintain an awareness that allows you to take note of valuable ideas.

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2011/10/the-importance-of-mind-wandering/

After the Show: The Many Faces of the Performer

music musical musician key keys stops stop play perform entertain entertainment tune pianist main hall theatre concert concert hall performing public performance public performances show shows concerts concert halls light lighting illumination illuminated

“The truly creative mind in any field is no more than this: A human creature born abnormally, inhumanly sensitive. To him… a touch is a blow, a sound is a noise, a misfortune is a tragedy, a joy is an ecstasy, a friend is a lover, a lover is a god, and failure is death. Add to this cruelly delicate organism the overpowering necessity to create, create, create — so that without the creating of music or poetry or books or buildings or something of meaning, his very breath is cut off from him. He must create, must pour out creation. By some strange, unknown, inward urgency he is not really alive unless he is creating.” ― Pearl S. Buck

An unpublished study of introversion, extroversion and creativity by Jennifer O. Grimes was cited by Scott Barry Kaufman at Psychology Today, Huffington Post, and Scientific American: After the Show: The Many Faces of the Performer:

“While most of the musicians reported some degree of shyness at some time in their lives, this was not reported as the main motivator for their reclusion. Social reclusion was reported as a result of their constant “overthinking”, rumination, concern regarding future events and possibilities, suspicions, and/or a sense of being philosophically overwhelmed. Most of Grimes’ subjects reported “overthinking everything” and being hypercritical, exhibiting critical attention to detail and a careful method of planning everything.”

“Many of Grimes’ subjects felt as though they were often misunderstood or perceived in a negative light, sometimes due to shyness. Other reasons for feeling misunderstood stemmed from a preference for solitude and an accompanying belief that their perceptions of appropriate social exchange with certain friends is dissonant from the expectations of these friends.”

“Subjects were in agreement that relating through art allowed them to ‘bridge the gap’ between their inner world and their outer world, and to be able to constructively enjoy their creativity without the pressures of emergent anxiety or a desire to withdraw.”

10 Ways To Stress Less

  1. Dance it out
  2. Go for a walk
  3. Talk about it
  4. Breathe
  5. Go to bed earlier
  6. Focus on what you can control
  7. Reminisce about good times
  8. Ask for a hug
  9. Look for opportunities in life’s challenges
  10. Smile

Patience | Enjoy The Ride

“Patience child, patience. Remember, life is a journey. If you got everything you wanted all at once there’d be no point to living. Enjoy the ride, and in the end you’ll see these “set backs” as giant leaps forward, only you couldn’t see the bigger picture in the moment. Remain calm, all is within reach; all you have to do is show up everyday, stay true to your path and you will surely find the treasure you seek.”
— Jackson Kiddard

The Pleasure of Simply Being

‎”Whenever you try to exert control over the natural ebb and flow of life, you end up either frustrated or disappointed– because it can’t be controlled. Whenever you apply effort to trying to relax and slow down, you produce the opposite effect. Whenever you try to dictate the outcome of your meditation you negate its most wondrous benefit– the pleasure of simply being.”
-Paul Wilson, The Quiet

The Four Agreements

Be impeccable with your word. Speak with integrity. Say only what you mean. Avoid using the word to speak against yourself or to gossip about others. Use the power of your word in the direction of truth and love.

Don’t take anything personally. Nothing others do is because of you. What others say and do is a projection of their own reality. When you are immune to the opinions and actions of others, you won’t be the victim of needless suffering.

Don’t make assumptions. Find the courage to ask questions and to express what you really want. Communicate with others as clearly as you can to avoid misunderstandings, sadness and drama. With just this one agreement, you can completely transform your life.

Always do your best. Your best is going to change from moment to moment; it will be different when you are healthy as opposed to sick. Under any circumstance, simply do your best, and you will avoid self-judgement, self-abuse and regret.

-Miguel Ángel Ruiz

12 Symptoms of Spiritual Awakening

  1. An increased tendency to let things happen rather than make them happen.
  2. Frequent attacks of smiling.
  3. Feelings of being connected with others and nature.
  4. Frequent overwhelming episodes of appreciation.
  5. A tendency to think and act spontaneously rather than from fears based on past experience.
  6. An unmistakable ability to enjoy each moment.
  7. A loss of ability to worry.
  8. A loss of interest in conflict.
  9. A loss of interest in interpreting the actions of others.
  10. A loss of interest in judging others.
  11. A loss of interest in judging self.
  12. Gaining the ability to love without expecting anything.

8 Ways To Get Smarter Every Week


1 out of every 4 Americans don’t read any books during the course of an average year.

For many Americans, learning stops after formal education.

The more active your brain stays during your life, the less likely you will be to develop Alzheimer’s disease or dementia.

Getting smarter involves a combination of learning new information, retaining that information, and maintaining the health of your brain. If you can manage to do all three, you’ll raise your intelligence by leaps and bounds.

Hale Daily | Time Alone with The Voices In My Head | Mirror Neurons | Godel, Escher, Bach

Wisely Waiter on Toady Frogman and the Soup Fly


Toady Frogman was a notorious lickspittle. Feety Footman’s boots were no match for Toady’s tenacious tongue. Footman promptly promoted Toady to Private Prince and treated him to an amphibious feast. As the wisely waiter set the salty soup upon the table he remarked, there’s a fly in your soup. To which Toady replied, an apple in my tree. And surely polished. (Hale Art: Toady Frogman, The Adventures Of)

What’s all this Toady Frogman nonsense?

Slow down there feller! Like many stories, the literal is downright dangerous. If we believed everything we read we’d be kissing frogs and I read once that if…

Site by Geoffrey Hale